Looks like it is going to be a good season in Douglas

This series of satellite-based growth vigour maps of the Douglas region (South Africa) compares the agricultural production of the current (summer 2018) season to those of 2016 and 2015. On a month-by-month basis it would seem that the actively growing crops of this season-- mostly maize (8200 ha), luserne/alfalfa (8850 ha) and cotton (1600 ha) -- exceeds those of 2017 and 2016. One can also clearly see that the rainfall in 2017 was substantially higher compared to this year (depicted by yellow tint of natural vegetation in 2017). This type of longitudinal comparison helps to estimate crop yields at regional scales. CropsMonitor has been helping GWK since 2016 on the use of satellite images

Tracking potato farming with satellite images and change analyses is … well … small potatoes!

Potato production in developing countries are rapidly increasing, which China being the largest producer by far. With ever-increasing demand for potatoes to feed the masses, new tools are needed to support farming decisions and to optimize yields. One such tool is simple change analyses on satellite imagery. The infographic below shows satellite images of a potato field acquired on two different dates (ten days apart). By visually comparing the two growth vigour images on the left it is difficult to see where and by how much growth has changed from 7 to 17 January. But when the 7 January image is subtracted from the 17 January image it is quite clear where the changes occurred. Farmers can t

Tracking potato farming with satellite images and change analyses is … well … small potatoes!

Potato production in developing countries are rapidly increasing, with China being the largest producer by far. With ever-increasing demand for potatoes to feed the masses, new tools are needed to support farming decisions and to optimize yields. One such tool is simple change analyses on satellite imagery. The infographic below shows satellite images of a potato field acquired on two different dates (ten days apart). By visually comparing the two growth vigour images on the left it is difficult to see where and by how much growth has changed from 7 to 17 January. But when the 7 January image is subtracted from the 17 January image it is quite clear where the changes occurred. Farmers can th

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